Formerly Alpha Omega ¬

ATAR anticipation builds

As the celebrations of schoolies subside and Christmas edges ever closer, the school leavers of 2017 have one pressing issue on their mind – their results.

This year HSC results will be available on Thursday, December 14, while the ATAR scores that allows them entry to university will be available from 7 am on December 15 – ATAR anticipation builds.

So how do you prepare for a score that signifies 13 years of schooling?

HSC versus ATAR

While results for the HSC indicate how well you’ve performed in individual subjects, the ATAR (Australia Tertiary Admissions Rank) is your overall position ranked against your peers.

In short, if a student receives an ATAR of 75 it means they’re considered to have performed better than 75 percent of their peers and are therefore in the top 25 percent of students participating that year.

The ATAR is the figure that universities use to assess your eligibility for their courses, and each course will have a different prerequisite depending on demand each year.

After ATARs are issued, universities will follow up with cut-offs and first round offers. For example, if engineering is in high demand in 2018, the cutoff at a specific university may be lifted from 89 to 91, meaning only students with an ATAR of 91 and above are eligible for entry.

What happens if I don’t get the result I’d hoped for?

Truth is the world will not end, the sun will still rise, and you have many options available at your fingertips.

It may mean attending a university with a lower cutoff or examining alternative options like obtaining a diploma first. Your careers advisor is best positioned to provide guidance on this issue.

Woohoo, I got a great score

Well done, and enjoy a celebration. This may not necessarily guarantee you entry into the university of your choice, however as cut-offs vary from year to year.

If your result is well above expectations, this might be time to revisit your university options and consider altering your university courses and preferences.

I want to take a gap year

After 13 years of study including two years of intensive HSC preparation, a gap year might be at the forefront of your mind.

If you’re planning on taking a year’s absence, you use the same process as all your peers, applying for the degrees and institutions of your choice. Once accepted, you will then need to formally apply to defer your studies, with most universities readily accepting deferrals of a year’s full-time study, and some even allowing further time. So, you have time anticipation builds

The Good Universities Guide notes:

“You can usually defer a full year of study, although some institutions allow you to put your place on hold for as long as two years. If you would prefer to take less time off, and if mid-year intake is available in your course, you can defer a single semester and begin your studies in July.

“Not all course places can be deferred, so it’s best to check with the institutions you have applied to if you are considering putting your place on hold. This may apply to courses that are particularly competitive or those that have intakes every second year. You may also find that this applies to vocational and postgraduate courses.”

About Chalkwall

For over 25 years Chalkwall has been assisting students to sail through their senior years and into university with confidence and ATAR anticipation builds. You can learn more about our tutoring services here, or contact us for further advice.